Category: Outbreak

Why is there extreme variability in death rates from COVID-19?

As the global pandemic spreads, nations are trying to take an example from countries who are managing to keep a low death count amidst COVID-19 outbreaks.

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How Nursing Homes Can Beat Deadly Viruses and Germs

Each year, up to 3 million infections occur in nursing homes, leading to approximately 380,000 deaths of residents. Proper hand hygiene can save lives.

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Flolive Article Featuring Soapy As a Solution To Stopping The Spread of COVID-19

Flolive featured us in a recent article, highlighting our innovative solution in the face of the recent COVID-19 pandemic.

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Managers – how to speak to your team about hand hygiene 

The post-COVID-19 world is going to look different, and hand hygiene is going to be at the front of both the consumer and the worker’s worries.


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The Importance of Hand Hygiene in Preventing a COVID-19 Outbreak in Nursing Homes

To help combat the spread of COVID-19 and save as many lives as possible, Soapy has decided to make nursing homes and institutes that treat the elderly a priority. Read how!

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News From Soapy: ECO Micro-Station COVID-19 Installation Improvements

Soapy has developed an app that will enable any institution an easy installation of the ECO micro-station, without the need for external help.

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Soapy is on the COVID-19 fighting map!

It’s an honor to be recognized as one of 80 Israeli startups fighting COVID-19 by Startup Nation Central.

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Coronavirus and Nursing Homes – What Can Be Done?

In the United States alone, there are 5 million senior citizens in nursing homes. In Israel, the population of elderly, aged 65 and over, is growing rapidly. In 2017, the elderly population of Israel crossed the 1-million line, amounting to about 11.6% of the total population.

But what are we doing to protect this layer of the population from the threat of coronavirus and other dangerous infectious diseases? After all, it is the elderly who are in the most vulnerable position to catch these illnesses. 

Some statistics

Probability of dying from coronavirus:

for 60-69 year olds – 3.6%

for 70-79 year olds – 8%

Elderly people aged 80+ are at the greatest risk, for them the probability of dying (in case they catch the Coronavirus) is 22%.

In addition, people with pre existing conditions such as respiratory system diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and diabetes are at a higher risk than healthy people. But it is precisely in old age that these complications are particularly prevalent.

Washington State as an example

At least 273 cases of coronavirus infection and most deaths (30 out of 38) occurred in Washington State. The main metropolis of this state – Seattle and its environs (total population – about 4 million people) became the largest outbreak of coronavirus in US.

19 of those 38 deaths in the state occurred at ‘Life Care Center’ – a nursing home located in Kirkland, a satellite city of Seattle with a population of about 90,000 people.

But why exactly did nursing homes become one of the most active distribution channels for coronavirus?

  • Coronavirus carries an increased danger for the elderly and those whose body is weakened by chronic diseases. There are almost no elderly people without chronic illnesses, so patients in nursing homes are doubly vulnerable.
  • The staff is in very close contact with the elderly. The staff themselves travel from the nursing home to other, less isolated locations where they are exposed to possible infection. Part of the staff, due to poor hand hygiene, will bring the infection to work.

Nursing homes need to adapt to new realities

  • Each staff representative should wash their hands efficiently and at appropriate intervals.
  • We must ensure the greatest possible isolation of the elderly from the outside world, but at the same time, we must give them the opportunity to feel needed and protected.
  • If you want to help and act as a volunteer, contact your local nursing home, social services or community charity organizations to see where you can contribute.

Soapy offers a unique solution for monitoring the hygiene of staff and patients. A smart micro-station for washing hands, which provides the right amount of water and reagents for washing hands and enables washing without touching a faucet. 

Micro-station also helps in ensuring that the hand-washing is performed correctly every time.

 

 
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Calcalist Tech: This Startup Wants to Fight Coronavirus With Soap and Water

Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and IoT technologies to help people wash their hands more efficiently

As fears surrounding the coronavirus continue to grow and the number of people forced into home-quarantine rises, Israeli startup Soapy Care Ltd. is aiming to halt the spread of the virus by helping people wash their hands more efficiently.

Founded in 2018 and based in Rehovot in central Israel, smart hygiene startup Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and Internet of things (IoT) technologies, Max Simonovsky, the company’s co-founder and CEO said in a Monday interview with Calcalist.

The smart sinks are autonomous and replace traditional sinks, Simonovsky said. Soapy Care’s sinks can be programmed with different settings, including the amount of time the water runs or the precise amount of soap or sanitizer dispensed, in accordance with where the smart sinks are situated, be it at restaurants, hospitals, retirement homes, daycares, or in private homes, Simonovsky said.

While the company suggests using specific types of soaps for better results, their sinks can be used with any standard soap, he said.

The idea for the smart sinks arose a few years ago when Simonovsky’s son, who was two years old at the time, told him he does not think handwashing is important given that some of the sinks at his daycare do not work properly.

Since the coronavirus outbreak, the company has dropped its prices for customers in hard-hit areas, such as China and South Korea, to help halt the spread of the virus, he said. The outbreak has led to a mass increase in the demand for Soapy Care’s smart sinks, Simonovsky added.

Soapy Care’s technology can be found at restaurants, factories, and daycares in countries including Israel, the U.S., Angola, and India, he said. The company has raised more than $1 million to date and employs a team of 22 people.

Source: Calcalist Tech

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CNN – The best prevention against the coronavirus is still washing your hands

(CNN)When it comes to novel coronavirus protection, face masks are futile. There isn’t a vaccine yet. So the best way to prevent transmission of the novel coronavirus is washing your hands — thoroughly — with soap and water, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
And yes, there’s a right way to wash your hands. It’s something of an art form — a timed, multistep process that can involve some light singing.
Here’s the CDC’s official hand-washing how-to. All you need to follow along is a sink and soap.
Step 1
Wet your hands with clean, running water. Then, turn off the tap and soap up your hands. Soap is more effective at removing germs than water alone.
Step 2
Work the soap into a lather by rubbing your hands together. Lather soap onto the backs of your hands, in between your fingers and under your nails. Lathering causes friction, which strips pesky germs and dirt from the skin. Be sure to get into the nooks and crannies, too — germs lurk there.
Source CNN
Step 3
Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Sing or hum “Happy Birthday” twice through to keep time. There’s no magic number, but washing your hands for at least 20 seconds has been shown to remove more microbes than washing for shorter periods does. Singing “Happy Birthday” is just a fun way to make sure you’re scrubbing long enough.
Step 4
Rinse your hands well under clean, running water. You’ve lifted the germs from your hands. Clean water flushes them off.
Step 5
Dry your hands using a clean towel or air-dry them (or a bit of both). Wet hands easily transfer viruses. Drying them off lessens that risk.
Original publication: link
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Coronavirus – what we know about it and how we can protect ourselves from getting ill?

According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
Coronaviruses are zoonotic types of viruses, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. Snakes – the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra – might be the original source of the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this year.
How does the infection pass from one to another?
The virus is transmitted both by airborne droplets and by contact: for example, through the touch of dirty hands to the eyes.
Know the Symptoms
The first signs of infection are dry cough, difficulty breathing, fever, and weakness. In some cases, the disease goes away without pneumonia but is accompanied by a dry cough and a low temperature. In more severe cases, the infection can evolve into pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. The incubation period of coronavirus lasts from 2 to 12 days.
Prevention
Be aware of washing hands and talking less with other people at close range.
Assure to cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing. It is emphasized that mild symptoms do not mean that a person cannot infect others.
Is it really helpful to wear a respiratory protection mask?
It is recommended to wear masks and assure that you are not touching your nose under it, especially when you shacked hands with somebody before. It is important to change your mask every new day or when you feel it is not clean enough.

The situation is aggravated by the fact that Asia is now celebrating the New Year, which means that many Chinese go to visit relatives.

The virus has spread to a number of Asian countries and has spread to France, USA, Canada and more. See the map below:
#coronavirusoutbreak #coronarovirus #nCoV #outbreak #virus #handswashing #handshygiene
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