Category: Influenza

Coronavirus and Nursing Homes – What Can Be Done?

In the United States alone, there are 5 million senior citizens in nursing homes. In Israel, the population of elderly, aged 65 and over, is growing rapidly. In 2017, the elderly population of Israel crossed the 1-million line, amounting to about 11.6% of the total population.

But what are we doing to protect this layer of the population from the threat of coronavirus and other dangerous infectious diseases? After all, it is the elderly who are in the most vulnerable position to catch these illnesses. 

Some statistics

Probability of dying from coronavirus:

for 60-69 year olds – 3.6%

for 70-79 year olds – 8%

Elderly people aged 80+ are at the greatest risk, for them the probability of dying (in case they catch the Coronavirus) is 22%.

In addition, people with pre existing conditions such as respiratory system diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and diabetes are at a higher risk than healthy people. But it is precisely in old age that these complications are particularly prevalent.

Washington State as an example

At least 273 cases of coronavirus infection and most deaths (30 out of 38) occurred in Washington State. The main metropolis of this state – Seattle and its environs (total population – about 4 million people) became the largest outbreak of coronavirus in US.

19 of those 38 deaths in the state occurred at ‘Life Care Center’ – a nursing home located in Kirkland, a satellite city of Seattle with a population of about 90,000 people.

But why exactly did nursing homes become one of the most active distribution channels for coronavirus?

  • Coronavirus carries an increased danger for the elderly and those whose body is weakened by chronic diseases. There are almost no elderly people without chronic illnesses, so patients in nursing homes are doubly vulnerable.
  • The staff is in very close contact with the elderly. The staff themselves travel from the nursing home to other, less isolated locations where they are exposed to possible infection. Part of the staff, due to poor hand hygiene, will bring the infection to work.

Nursing homes need to adapt to new realities

  • Each staff representative should wash their hands efficiently and at appropriate intervals.
  • We must ensure the greatest possible isolation of the elderly from the outside world, but at the same time, we must give them the opportunity to feel needed and protected.
  • If you want to help and act as a volunteer, contact your local nursing home, social services or community charity organizations to see where you can contribute.

Soapy offers a unique solution for monitoring the hygiene of staff and patients. A smart micro-station for washing hands, which provides the right amount of water and reagents for washing hands and enables washing without touching a faucet. 

Micro-station also helps in ensuring that the hand-washing is performed correctly every time.

 

 
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Hand hygiene decreases school absenteeism

Photo for representation only.
Hand hygiene helps to reduce school absenteeism rates due to illnesses by almost 40% of studies suggest, said a senior healthcare professional.
While many factors contribute to school absenteeism, student illness is believed to be the main driver of student absenteeism.
The transmission of infections within schools can result in infections making students too sick to attend classes, said Dr Mohammed Rahmathulla Shafeeq, Assistant Executive Director of Infection Prevention and Control at Hamad Medical Corporation.
He urged parents and teachers to place special focus on handwashing.
“Proper and regular handwashing is essential for children as it ensures hygiene and averts infection,” said Dr Shafeeq.
“Keeping hands clean through improved hand hygiene is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others. Many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water. If soap and water are unavailable, use hand sanitiser,” he said.
Diseases such as flu, common cold, vomiting, diarrhoea, and stomach flu are common diseases that can be positively impacted by more frequent hand hygiene and routine cleaning and disinfection of commonly touched surfaces.
“Proper and regular handwashing at school and outside keeps children free of infection. And schools should have proper facilities that help students easily wash their hands and maintain proper hygiene,” said Dr Shafeeq.
“Sinks should be placed in a place that is quite accessible for all students. And we recommend liquid soaps as soap bars cause infection to be transmitted from an infected child to others while it is used for handwashing,” he added.
Dr Shafeeq also said that tissue papers should be made available and children should be asked to make use of them after washing hands.
“Possibility of infection is high if the hands remain wet,” he said.
Dr Shafeeq also urged the school authorities to ensure that enough break time is available for all.
“Inadequacy of time can create inconvenience for students and this should be addressed. And all students should be given bathroom break if they demand it during class time,” he said.
He asked parents to teach their children personal hygiene and ensure hygiene is properly maintained in order to ensure that their children are free of infection.
“Children should be asked to take regular baths and brushing of teeth. And they should be sent to school with cleaned washed clothes,” he said.
Dr Shafeeq urged school authorities to regularly clean and maintain water cooler dispensers and air conditioning units in order to ensure they don’t transmit anything harmful.
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Office Germs getting more dangerous

For the full textfollow the link on “back off bacteria” blog
#Office #Superbugs #Bacteria #Antibioticresistance #Handwash #Toilet #workplace #healthsafety #productivity #publichealth
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How Hand Washing Technique Affects Bacteria Level on Hands

Bloodstream infections (BSI) are one of the most cited complications among hemo-dialysis patients within dialysis units (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017). These types of infectious complications, such as peritonitis, often associated with unhygienic technique and exit-siteinfection. Prevention of exit-site location is largely associated with skin-resident microbes. Approximately 42% of peritonitis episodes are known to be associated with touch contamination.
One of the most commonly cited tools to prevent infections is efficient hand washing (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017). In 2005, the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) recommended hand washing as a standard care recommendation and procedure to befollowed in dialysis treatment centers.
In a 2013 study, researchers compared the hand washing efficiency of two different techniques for patients undergoing dialysis care: (1) the use of simple hand hygiene followed by antiseptic hand hygiene, and (2) only antiseptic hand washing. Simple hand hygiene followed traditional hand washing techniques, while the antiseptic hand hygiene mechanism included the use of 3 mL of 70% ethyl alcohol as a mechanism. Interestingly, this study found that the number of bacteria found on hands was increased when the mechanism for hand washing included the use of simple hand hygiene in addition to the antiseptic hand washing method in comparison to only antiseptic hand washing.
The results of this study potentially indicate that one of biggest hindrances in achieving bacteria-free hands is the use of improper or ineffective techniques for washing hands. This study indicates that one of the largest obstacles to achieving sufficient hand hygiene likely relies on the ability of patients to accurately and efficiently clean their hands.
References:Center of Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). Infection Prevention Tools. U.S. Department of Heath & Human Services. Retrieved from:https://www.cdc.gov/dialysis/prevention-tools/index.html
Figueiredo, A. E., de Siqueira, S. L., Poli-de-Figueiredo, C. E., & d’Avila, D. O. (2013). Hand hygiene in peritoneal dialysis patients: a comparison of two techniques. Peritoneal Dialysis International, 33(6), 655-661.
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