Coronavirus – what we know about it and how we can protect ourselves from getting ill?

According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
Coronaviruses are zoonotic types of viruses, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. Snakes – the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra – might be the original source of the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this year.
How does the infection pass from one to another?
The virus is transmitted both by airborne droplets and by contact: for example, through the touch of dirty hands to the eyes.
Know the Symptoms
The first signs of infection are dry cough, difficulty breathing, fever, and weakness. In some cases, the disease goes away without pneumonia but is accompanied by a dry cough and a low temperature. In more severe cases, the infection can evolve into pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. The incubation period of coronavirus lasts from 2 to 12 days.
Prevention
Be aware of washing hands and talking less with other people at close range.
Assure to cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing. It is emphasized that mild symptoms do not mean that a person cannot infect others.
Is it really helpful to wear a respiratory protection mask?
It is recommended to wear masks and assure that you are not touching your nose under it, especially when you shacked hands with somebody before. It is important to change your mask every new day or when you feel it is not clean enough.

The situation is aggravated by the fact that Asia is now celebrating the New Year, which means that many Chinese go to visit relatives.

The virus has spread to a number of Asian countries and has spread to France, USA, Canada and more. See the map below:
#coronavirusoutbreak #coronarovirus #nCoV #outbreak #virus #handswashing #handshygiene
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Soapy is on the Map!

With its unique history and rich cultural heritage, Israel is also among the forward-looking countries placing a heavy emphasis on innovation and technology. Many indicators – from research and development spending to intellectual property – support this statement. Last year, the nine-million-people-large state entered the top 10 list of the Global Innovation Index, an annual ranking published by INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Israel’s figures are impressive by any standards. 
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
In this article, we talk about some layers beyond microelectronics. The growth-stage enterprises that are making attempts within the blurry border zone between physical and digital are in our scope this time. The Internet of Things (IoT), a construct that many consider conceptually fusty nowadays, is still yet to show its full potential – this is one of those areas where theory has far surpassed practice (we don’t mean to call it ‘futurology’).
As the gap between the IoT that exists in PowerPoint slides and the one that exists in the real world becomes even more evident, a bunch of commercial opportunities are appearing for those who are able to employ unconventional approaches to thorny problems using IoT. A plethora of startups are trying their best in the ever-emerging domain in Israel.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
In this article, we talk about some layers beyond microelectronics. The growth-stage enterprises that are making attempts within the blurry border zone between physical and digital are in our scope this time. The Internet of Things (IoT), a construct that many consider conceptually fusty nowadays, is still yet to show its full potential – this is one of those areas where theory has far surpassed practice (we don’t mean to call it ‘futurology’).
As the gap between the IoT that exists in PowerPoint slides and the one that exists in the real world becomes even more evident, a bunch of commercial opportunities are appearing for those who are able to employ unconventional approaches to thorny problems using IoT. A plethora of startups are trying their best in the ever-emerging domain in Israel.
Here comes the first insight. Taking into account funding rounds that have been announced over the past several years, we can see that the investment activity has been going full blast between January and March each year. (Is the fruitless fourth quarter of 2019 the calm before the storm?)
Besides, the annual amount of money banked by Israeli IoT challengers peaked in the third quarter of 2017, when pilotless drone solution developer Airobotics bagged USD 32.5 million from Californian fund BlueRun Ventures among other investors; the same year, machine learning pioneer Iguazio took home USD 33 million.
We have seen a few more big rounds in this sphere, not to mention some adjacent fields like software, which is traditionally strong in a country famous for its programmers. Silicon Wadi, an analog of the well-known American region, is germinating multiple disruptors here and there, making the world’s finest institutional and corporate investors pay attention. 
So, why Tel Aviv?
Indeed, being the capital is not enough. Though most of the high-income small-sized economies are often associated with one (two, at the max) colossal cities, this story is more complicated in Israel. For instance, the population is almost evenly distributed across the country’s six districts – and Tel Aviv is only second on the list. The OECD’s 2018 edition of ‘Regions and Cities at a Glance’ shows that the city is leading by four of the 10 ‘well-being’ aspects, while the Central district (or HaMerkaz) is excelling in the other four.
In order to answer the question above, we employed a proxy that is pretty close to the topic of this article. Namely, the number of startups that leverage IoT. Aside from that, there are two other variables that fortify the argument in favor of Tel Aviv: the total dollar volume of venture capital raised and the number of private equity investment events. 
Taking over half of all the three ‘pies,’ the capital of Israel has some substantial numbers to prove its local dominance. Out of 67 recently active private IoT companies, 37 are located in Tel Aviv’s agglomerated zone. Since 2014, they have completed 73 rounds of financing, nabbing over USD 270 million to carry out their long-cherished ideas.
Not alike
These 37 firms are, for sure, different in many respects. Both the technologies they leverage and the ways they make (or intend to make) money are unalike. As the former is typically dictated by the applications – which is a new normal, look at the Integrated Circuit (IC) industry, for example – we divided the Tel Aviv startups into 11 groups based on the real economy sectors that they are operating in. 
As a matter of fact, connectivity of any type must be secure as modern-day misdeeds like data theft and invasion of privacy are, paradoxical as it may sound, becoming easier as technology advances. Since 2014, Tel Aviv-based network security companies have gained over a third of the total dollar volume of IoT PE/VC funding in the city.
Two-year-old IT firm Axonius, for one, had a productive 2019: after raising USD 13 million from Bessemer in February, it proceeded with a USD 20 million Series B in August. Another young and promising player – end-to-end security solution provider VDOO – absorbed USD 32 million in GGV Capital-led Series B last year.
At the forefront of a quest to optimize manufacturing environments and operations by deploying smart sensors and accelerating information transmission, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is also widely represented in the affluent middle eastern country.
Tel Aviv’s up-and-coming IoT hardware producers, retail tech companies and smart home evangelists also obtained relatively big amounts of money between 2014 and 2019. The largest disclosed round in these three clusters was closed by deep learning microprocessor developer Hailo. Backed by Chinese fund Glory Ventures (耀途资本) and the automotive industry-focused Maniv Mobility, the chipmaker has raised a total of USD 24.5 million in venture capital to date.
The other sectors are significant too. Let’s take, for example, the retail industry or the smart home domain. One would think a country with almost no domestic market doesn’t need its own Alibabas and Xiaomis. However, the scale is not the only factor: many business models in the consumer sector can be easily adapted to other markets. As a result, companies like ‘customer experience crafter’ Anagog appear and attract investors’ attention.
Here below, we have compiled a list of 20 early-stage Tel Aviv upstarts with significant growth potential and exceptional business models, using a handful of investment and business-related variables. The final list of ‘laureates’ spans ten distinct areas, including incumbent industries like healthcare and logistics, as well as evolving concepts like smart cities and IIoT. 
For the original article follow this link
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Soapy is on the main stage of the largest positive impact gathering in the world

Our Founder & CEO, Max Simonovsky, is going to present our mission at the largest impact gathering in the world – ChangeNow 2020 that will take place on January 30-31 and February 1st, 2020. PARIS, Grand Palais.
We are excited to share this great news! Please join us on our journey to a better world.
This summit is also called: World Expo of solutions for the planet.
ChangeNOW is all about concrete actions and innovations: climate change, end of plastic pollution, new forms of agriculture, new models of education, solutions to the refugee crisis, clean energy, sustainable cities, … and other solutions to our most urgent global issues.
Wish us a stroke of good luck and share your support!
See you soon in Paris!
#ChangeNow2020 #Innovation #Summit #Hygiene #SmartHygiene
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Jersusalem Shawarma facing backlash after suspected norovirus outbreak at Calgary restaurants

A family-owned chain of Calgary shawarma restaurants is facing backlash after Alberta Health Services revealed a suspected norovirus outbreak linked to their restaurants.
According to AHS, nearly 130 people have registered complaints that they fell ill after eating food from Jerusalem Shawarma.
AHS said Thursday it received its first complaint about Jerusalem Shawarma on Dec. 6.
More complaints were later made by 17 different groups who said they ate food from multiple Jerusalem Shawarma locations from Dec. 4 to 12.
“Please don’t judge us,” Jerusalem Shawarma co-owner Izzo AbuFarha said. “It was just an isolated [incident] in one of our locations, it didn’t happen all over the place.”
AbuFarha and his five brothers own the 10-restaurant chain, which opened in 2013.
He said they’ve has complied with AHS health inspectors, who recommended the restaurant wash common surfaces and the washrooms every 30 minutes.
AHS said they are currently investigating each complaint to verify the claims, with many coming from groups that fell ill after eating catered lunches.
All of the chain’s locations were inspected by AHS, but none of the restaurants were ordered to close.
“Anything that was of concern, like the ready-to-eat food products, have all been discarded — those things have been started from scratch again. There’s been full disinfections at each of the locations, so we’ve ensured that public safety is number one,” AHS Calgary Zone safe food program manager Sarah Nunn said.
“If there was any serious concerns, then absolutely those locations would’ve been closed.”
Following the news of the AHS investigation, AbuFarha said the restaurant has seen a steep decline in business, including multiple cancellations of catering orders.
He said the restaurant has also received racist comments. “This is something we’ve been getting on a daily basis, lots of bad comments, lots of messages, lots of threatening, lots of phone calls to our staff, to our employees,” AbuFarha said.
Faizan Butt, the lawyer representing Jerusalem Shawarma, said the investigation has been blown out of proportion.
According to AHS, the virus is common around this time of year and is extremely contagious. Symptoms of norovirus include severe stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea, and can last anywhere from 24 to 60 hours, AHS said.
The best way to prevent infection is to wash your hands often and wash fruits and vegetables before eating them.
“The biggest thing is it’s out there in the community, and it’s about prevention,” Nunn said. “It’s about making sure that we don’t pass this on to anybody else.”
Nunn said AHS takes every complaint seriously and recommends anybody with concerns to contact AHS or 811 with health questions.​
AbuFarha said his employees are taking AHS’ advice seriously, all in an effort to go on with business as usual.
“We’re seeking the support of our community, we’re seeking the support of Calgarians in making this business get back to normal,” he said.
With files from Global News’ Kaylen Small
Original article: LINK
#Outbreak #Norovirus #Food #AHS #JerusalemShawarma #Canada #Calgary
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Spot Light – Welcome Marat Altynbaev

Marat is an experienced process analyst with a demonstrated history of working in the industrial engineering industry. Skilled in Data Analytics, BI, Process Improving, and ERP Systems. Marat has a passion for entrepreneurship and impact-driven ventures.
B.Sc in Industrial Engineering & Management with a specialization in information technologies at SCE – Sami Shamoon College of Engineering. Marat participated in the international entrepreneurship program at UNLV (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) and took part in 2 business accelerators in Israel.
We trust Marat with our company’s vision and needs. Experienced on one side and eager to solve complex challenges, Marat is a real asset for our team. We are happy to have such a great, hard-working entrepreneur in our team!
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365x Show case

It all started when we arrived on the 41st floor on top of the Salesforce Tower on the 6th avenue in NY.
The view was unbelievable
The 365x acceleration program of Sarona Ventures that enhance scalability for Software or IoT Startup Companies. Surrounded by talented Executives and Entrepreneurs, that help to sharpen business, product, and technology, while accessing an international customer and distributors network to affirm reliable traction towards scalability. The program manager, Liron Winberg, succeeded in packing the room with investors and innovation leaders from the New York community. Thanks to Liron, the event felt like a community of high-class professionals. That came to share and brainstorm as One group and not as individuals that just met.
Our CEO and co-Founder, Mr. Max Simonovsky, was honored to be the last presenter.
Mr. Simonovsky closed his pitch session with a clear message of our vision: We should do Business for Impact and Impact for a better future.
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Come meet us at the Thoracic Oncology Symposium in Milan

A fully interactive comprehensive symposium that covers all aspects of the most up to date thoracic surgery, oncology and pneumology and their interdisciplinary relationship.
Providing all the elements to develop an advanced and successful program for the diagnosis, care and treatment of the different stages of lung cancer.
For more information visit: https://thoraciconcology.it/
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Spot Light – Welcome Jane Shpits, our new Operation Manager

Jane is a serial entrepreneur with a passion for impact-driven innovation. Jane has 18 years of experience in SaaS and ERP, HR products, with a strong technical background combined with experience in project and operation management.
B.Sc in Industrial Engineering & Management at Shenkar and IDF programming (MAMRAM) and system analysis courses.
We trust Jane with our company’s vision and needs. Experienced on one side and eager to solve any challenge, Jane is a real asset for Soapy. We are happy to have such a great, hard-working innovator in our team!
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CDC – Food workers washed their hands in only 27% of activities in which they should have.

New research of the CDC reveals that food workers washed their hands in only 27% of the activities in which they should have.
Based on the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) recommendations when workers need to wash hands
  • Eating,
  • Drinking,
  • Using tobacco,
  • Coughing,
  • Sneezing,
  • Using tissue,
  • Preparing raw animal products,
  • Handling dirty equipment, and
  • Touching the body (such as scratching your nose).
CDC found that overall, workers engaged in about 9 activities an hour that should have involved handwashing with water and soap. Unfortunately, in most of the cases, they did not:
Other interesting find was that, workers were more likely to wash their hands at the right time when they were not wearing gloves than when they were.
The research was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net). EHS-Net is a federally funded collaboration of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists and epidemiologists.
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Spot Light – Welcome David, our new Team member

We trust David with all of our business needs. Eager and curious, David proves that no technological feat is too big to tackle. We are happy to have this hard-working innovator in our team!
David is a full-stack software developer with extensive knowledge in the back end and sophisticated database design. Substantial experience in web and data development. David has a Bachelor Degree in Computer Science and 3 years of hands-on experience.
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Soapy at the prestigious IPIEC Finals

Noa Muzzafi, Our good friend, Asia market adviser and an amazing person, represent Soapy at the prestigious Finals of the IPIEC! Goooo Noa!!!
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The dangers of trachoma – Prevented by hygiene

Trachoma is among the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), which are a group of parasitic and bacterial infectious diseases that affect 1.5 billion people, and 40 percent live in Africa.
NTDs affect the poorest, most vulnerable people who live in hard to reach parts of Africa.
The diseases, experts say, disfigure and disable, keep children out of school and parents out of work, limiting their potential in communities stuck in poverty.
Prevention includes personal cleanliness, especially of the face and hands.
NTDs rank among the four most devastating groups of communicable diseases.
Prosper Dusengeyezu, a public health officer at Rwanda Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (RPSA), says the conditions cause severe pain and long-term disability and lead to death in many people.
He says amongst children, infection leads to malnutrition, cognitive impairment, stunted growth, and the inability to attend school.
He adds that social isolation and physical ailments make working difficult for people with NTDs. Many people are unable to provide for themselves or their families and are left in a cycle of poverty.
Some of the other common NTDs include; Lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminths, among others.
TRACHOMA TYPES
Trachoma is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the conjunctival covering of the eye, the cornea, and the eyelids.
It is often associated with poverty and lack of proper hygiene.
Dusengeyezu says this condition is caused by the Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria and that it is essentially totally preventable and curable if it is diagnosed and treated early.
Meanwhile, trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness in the world.
The types, Dr. Francis Kazungu, a general practitioner in Kigali, says include acute trachoma which is frequently found in children who are dirty, dusty and unhealthy.
He says the condition manifests as painful eyes, swollen eyelids, watery discharge from the eyes and itching of the eyes with ear, nose, and throat infection.
“It usually affects one eye and gradually spreads to the other,”
he says.
There is also recurring trachoma, where he says that if poor hygiene persists, the person gets affected again and again.
Kazungu says there is also chronic trachoma, where it causes inward turning of the eyelid such that the eyelashes rub against the cornea.
“Gradually, the symptoms persist and instead of resolving, lead to chronic trachoma and blindness between 30 to 40 years if left untreated,”
he adds.
WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS?
Yvan Ntwali, a Kigali-based ophthalmologist, says factors that escalate the risk of contracting trachoma include poverty.
He explains that trachoma is primarily a disease of extremely poor populations in developing countries.
Another risk factor, he says, is crowded living conditions, adding that people living in close contact are at greater risk of spreading infection.
Poor sanitation, he says, poor sanitary conditions and lack of hygiene, such as unclean faces or hands, help spread the disease.
Age is also another factor in areas where the disease is active, and it’s most common in children four to six years of age.
Gender, he says, is another risk factor. Women’s rate of contracting the disease is two to six times higher than that of men.
Lack of latrines, he explains, like populations without access to functioning latrines (a type of communal toilet) have a higher rate of the disease.
CAUSES
Ntwali says trachoma is caused by certain subtypes of chlamydia trachomatis, a bacterium that can also cause the sexually transmitted infection, chlamydia.
He notes that the condition spreads through contact with discharge from the eyes or nose of an infected person.
Hands, clothing, towels, and insects can all be routes for transmission. In developing countries, eye-seeking flies also are a means of transmission, Ntwali says.
HOW TO TELL
Ntwali further says that the major symptoms or signs of the initial stages of trachoma consist of; Irritation and mild itching of the eyelids or eyes, drainage from the eyes that contain pus or mucus.
As the disease progresses, Ntwali says trachoma symptoms include, blurred vision and a marked sensitivity to light referred to as photophobia.
Another symptom, he says, is a pain in the eye.
He explains that young children are most susceptible to this disease but the infection normally advances gradually, and the most painful signs or symptoms normally will not develop until adulthood.
COMPLICATIONS
Kazungu says trachoma causes irritation of the eyes, starting with simple redness of the eyes and lids, progressing to the inward turning of the lids and irritation and scarring of the cornea, which may then progress to an opaque cornea resulting in blindness.
These complications, he says, are avoidable with adequate diagnosis and treatment.
With the development of the later stages of trachoma, with scarring of the lids and conjunctiva, he says vision is often decreased to the point where the individual is no longer able to work, resulting in the disruption of the family.
Because of profound visual disturbance or blindness, Ntwali says there may be an increased number of related injuries or even accidental death.
PREVENTION
Dusengeyezu notes that maintaining good hygiene and sanitation is essential to prevent this disease in developing countries, which has been eradicated in developed countries.
This, he says, includes avoiding physical contact with a person suffering from trachoma.
Another prevention measure Dusengeyezu says, includes personal cleanliness, especially of the face and hands.
“Washing hands and face frequently with soap and water is important, especially in children who are already infected to prevent re-infection,”
he adds.
Besides, he says, keeping food covered and using clean latrines and toilets to prevent the breeding of flies is important. TREATMENT
According to Dusengeyezu, the treatment is relatively simple.
He says a single oral dose of antibiotics is the preferred treatment, plus making safe water available and teaching simple cleanliness.
“Because of cultural differences and widespread poverty in endemic areas, this regimen is difficult to implement on a universal scale,”
he says. Treatment also involves screening communities for the presence of trachoma in children one to nine years of age.
When over 10 percent are found to have a clinical disease, he says the entire community is treated with antibiotics. In areas with less disease, only targeted groups are treated
“Due to the contagiousness of trachoma, it is necessary to treat all who might be in contact with the infected individuals,”
he adds.
When trachoma has progressed to the inward-turning of the lashes, he says that surgery is necessary to correct this and prevent the lashes from scarring the cornea.
The performance of this surgery can be taught to nurses or other medical personnel.
Ntwali adds that if significant corneal scarring already exists, corneal transplantation surgery may be required, which should be performed by an ophthalmologist.
original text link: newtimes
#news #publications #healthcare #healthsafety #children #education #trachoma #handwash
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