Allergies Or COVID19? How To Tell Them Apart

July 23, 2020 Ofir Broides Vavker

Seasonal allergies have a few symptoms in common with coronavirus. Usually, allergies cause an itchy and stuffy nose, itchy and watery eyes, sneezing and flu-like snot. Sometimes they can cause coughing, or even trigger an asthma attack. These symptoms all resemble some of the typical COVID-19 symptoms. However, telling an allergy attack from the coronavirus apart is quite easy.

Having allergies during these difficult times can be stressful, so we’ve spoken to the experts in order to gather knowledge on the differences between allergies and COVID-19. However – this article is not to be used as medical advice in any way. If you’re feeling ill you should consult a medical professional and you should not rely on information you read online. If you suspect you might be infected by the coronavirus, the safest practice is to stay home in order to avoid spreading the disease further.

1. Consider all of the symptoms

It’s very rare for allergies to cause a fever or disrupt the sense of taste, unlike coronavirus. Muscle aches, severe headaches and a sore throat are also possible signs for coronavirus presence, which are not usually caused by allergies. If you take the time to make a list of all of the symptoms you’re experiencing, it becomes easier to tell the two apart.

2. Have you ever had allergies before?

It’s true that allergies can appear at any age, but typically those who have them know their bodies well enough to recognize an allergic reaction. Some allergies come every year, during regular seasons and months, which is why they are called “seasonal allergies”. It’s true that everyone is extremely worried about the coronavirus outbreak and many people examine their reactions with extra scrutiny. However, this could lead to a psychological effect of confusing the usual symptoms for COVID-19 symptoms. If you’ve had allergies in the past, usually around this time of the year, and are not exhibiting more coronavirus symptoms, it most probably means that your symptoms are a part of your usual allergic reaction.

3. Think it’s allergies? There is a variety of over-the-counter allergy medicine

Antihistamine medicine alleviates most of the symptoms related to allergic rhinitis. You can ask your local pharmacy what they have in stock. After taking the medicine, if your body’s reaction calms down, this increases the chance of you having allergies. Remember, to use non-sedating antihistamines and not sedating antihistamines (such as Benadryl).

Before purchasing or using any drug – consult with a healthcare professional (doctor or pharmacist). This article is not to be considered medical advice.

4. Checking in with your family doctor

Most of the time, these inquiries need to be handled by professionals. Your doctor will most likely ask a few questions to determine if what you’re experiencing is allergies, especially if you’ve had them in the past. Itchy eyes and nose are a dead giveaway to allergies.

5. You can always have a laugh at it

After you have checked with your family doctor, you can sit back, relax and enjoy the wonders of the Internet. Luckily, the internet knows how to not take life so seriously. We’ve gathered a few of the best memes, showing what it’s like to be allergic at the same time as a global pandemic.

“I wonder…”
Sometimes we forget that other illnesses aside from coronavirus still exist out there
We know how you feel…
We’ve all been there
Yep. That’s exactly it.

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